A spotlight on Enrichment and nature: looking for pleasing displays and conservation information

In each newsletter we’ll focus on one of the Culture Segments and their connection to nature and wildlife. This month we’re looking at Enrichment and how to connect them more deeply with your work, whether you’re a wildlife attraction, nature reserve, or other cultural or heritage organisation with a renewed focus on ecology.  

Overall, Enrichment are looking to enjoy and preserve the natural environment. Here’s how to engage them:

Show your conservation efforts

Conservation, for Enrichment, is hugely important, and while this often translates into an interest in preserving tradition, it can also mean a concern for our changing planet and extinction of species. This segment will want to hear how you’re conserving the planet, and are willing to make changes to their environmental behaviour at home. Just don’t expect to see them in Extinction Rebellion!

Offer opportunities for appreciation of nature

Enrichment have an average connection with nature overall, but they are likely to be found with soil under their nails due to their love of gardening. They like natural environments that are well-kept, rather than wild, so will likely be drawn to visual displays of nature that are aesthetically-pleasing and well-maintained. 

Emphasise the longevity of your organisation or cause

Enrichment want to invest in something tried and tested, so show how your work is part of a long history (if you’re relatively new, show longevity in relation to your cause and work). Similarly, Enrichment want to be sure their investments stand the test of time, so, in development, consider targeting them for capital projects.

Keep things simple on site

Enrichment value information boards and maps and are unlikely to investigate anything interactive. They also prefer to learn facts rather than stories about the wildlife, so keep things relatively simple. 


As a Senior Research Executive, Laura designs, analyses and reports on a variety of research...